Entries to Win Afghan


If you like my books, essays, etc. you might want to put your name on this private email list (no spam ever) for advance notices, coupons, and occasional freebies. Tell your friends too! Books Leaving Footprints Newsletter. Previous gifts include a short story, a poem and a half-off coupon for the newest book. Sign up, and don't miss out!"
Winners are: 3rd place- e-book of your choice: Wendy Nystrom. 2nd place- book of your choice, paper or e-book: Sue Ann Crawford. Winner of the afghan: Elaine Hull.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Ogichidaa - The Face in the Rock

 
On the way home Lyle and I accidentally managed to see something that I've been wanting to find. A friend in the UP told me about this, but I hadn't seen it.

There is no sign at the road. We just happened to pick this rest stop and discovered interpretive panels near the beach.

In 1820 a likeness of an Nishnaabe Indian was carved in the rock by a French Voyageur who was accompanying Lewis Cass on his exploration that eventually led him to the headwaters of the Mississippi River. The Indian's name was Ogichidaa, Powers of the Air. He was one of the last of the Nishnaabe tribe that lived near here and on Grand Island.

This was the view from the sign. Wonder where the face is?

the Face in the Rock

I scanned the rocks with the telephoto lens, but I didn't know what size of a carving I was looking for.

We decided to walk down the beach.

the Face in the Rock

Can you see it now?

the Face in the Rock

Aha! It is only a little over a foot high. Another sign had warned us it was badly eroded.

the Face in the Rock

Here's what it probably looked like originally. This was on one of the signs.

the Face in the Rock

There is a short book about the history of it all that I have seen, but I don't own it.

And soon I'll be off to work for the night. No sleep tomorrow because there is a local author event I'll be participating in.

See Saturday Sheyenne
if you like this blog, click the +1   or

Like This!


Thursday, September 22, 2016

Saturday Sheyenne with Dan & Ruth

 
Saturday was the day almost everyone traveled by bus to the Sheyenne National Grassland in North Dakota. The eastern portion has low hills with more trees than the western part which is level prairie.

Sheyenne National Grassland

There were hikes of various lengths. I chose the 6.5 mile one because it had a special emphasis. You may or may not remember that I've had some other chances to hike with a couple who have been working on a section hike of the entire North Country Trail (see link at end). They were all but done a month ago, but saved this section so they could complete their trek at the conference.

Dan and Ruth complete the NCT

They are such nice people that everyone was delighted to share this moment with them.

Dan and Ruth complete the NCT

There was even champagne and cookies!

NCT cookies

Part of the evening activities was my plug for long-distance hikes on the NCT, which included giving them their patches and certificates for finishing their End-to-End hikes.

Dan and Ruth complete the NCT

After that, they gave a program about their 17-year journey.

They've become two of my closest trail friends. May the hiking never stop!

See Two Awesome Days
if you like this blog, click the +1   or

Like This!


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Tamarack Friday

 
Lest you think all the fun and beauty I care about right now happened near Fargo, here is this morning's sunrise. These colors are true. I don't think I've ever seen a sunrise like this.

sunrise

But now we're going back to the conference. Friday the long hike (13 miles) was through the Tamarack Wildlife Refuge in western Minnesota. The trail is completely different from what it was when I hiked through there. That was a temporary route and mostly on refuge roads. This is a permanent trail route, off road and protected.

We started in the rain. Real rain. For the first hour, and we were all soaked. But by 9:30 or so people were stripping off rain gear.

Tamarack Wildlife refuge

A lot of Tamarack is forested, so we alternated between open grassy areas and wooded trail.

Tamarack Wildlife refuge

The weather for the rest of the hike was beautiful. Partly sunny and temperatures that were great for hiking. This is South Chippewa Lake.

Tamarack Wildlife refuge

One of the most interesting details was this mass of fungus. I think it's "Ruffles," Sparassis crispa.

fungus

There are always lots of aspects of the evening programs that might not be of much interest to you, but they are very important to those of us who love this trail. This is the outgoing board president, Tom Moberg. He and his wife, Mary, are from Fargo and also headed up the committee that planned the conference (read BIG job).

Tom Moberg

Friday night was the night for awards. There are awards from the National Park Service for hours spent volunteering for the trail. This is Mark Weaver, the NPS Superintendent for the North Country Trail, getting ready to start the presentations.

Mark Weaver

He was followed by the awards that are given to outstanding volunteers by the North Country Trail Association. All recipients are highly deserving!

There were a couple other things crammed in the day somewhere, as well. If you want down time, you have to skip something. I like keeping things hopping. We only get to see all these friends once a year, so I say "make the most of it!"

See Thursday in Fargo
if you like this blog, click the +1   or

Like This!


Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Thursday in Fargo

 
It seems as though I can't get all the ducks lined up to do blog posts on the road very well. Now I know how to use the phone as a hot spot. Check. However, one also needs a place to plug in the computer, and time to actually do the post.

I was sleeping in the back of Lyle's truck (on a bed he had made- very comfy), but we forgot to take an extra electric cord so that I could also plug in. And every minute was packed with activities and friends and trail stuff. Since those are the things I go to the conference for, the blog gets the short end of the stick.

But I'll get you caught up. Thursday I went on a short hike on an urban trail right in Fargo.

hike in Fargo

We mostly followed right beside the Red River of the north.

Red River

We crossed a bridge and were then in Minnesota. The locals there have a joke similar to the one in Michigan about where you can look south into Canada. The Red River winds and twists so much there is a peninsula where you can stand in Minnesota and look east into North Dakota!

The Hjemkomst Center is in Minnesota and we got to peek at the Viking Ship. A real tour of that was a different activity. (I'd been there before so chose a hike since one can't do everything.) This ship was completed in 1980 and is a replica of one discovered in Norway in 1880. This ship was sailed to Norway and then returned to it's home where it is the centerpiece of the museum

viking ship

Once we were outside again, and interpreter joined us to explain some of the rather humorous history of alcohol on the area. North Dakota passed laws to go dry before prohibition, so of course all the bars simply moved across the river into Minnesota. Here we are being shown some fragments of liquor jugs and glasses.

hike in Fargo

For the afternoon activity I chose a tour of the historic Fargo theater. Its story is similar to that of the Vogue in Manistee. It's been restored and is now operated as a non-profit association.

Fargo theater

We had a demonstration and concert on the Wurlitzer theater pipe organ. It is the largest one between Minneapolis and California. That was really interesting. The organist let us hear a lot of the sounds and special effects separately, and then also played several songs.

pipe organ

That evening after dinner the program was a charcoal artist who told the history of the Red River Valley and western Minnesota with words and drawings. It was truly excellent. Everyone was pretty much spellbound.

history talk

Camping at the conferences is much cheaper, but it's harder with logistics than staying with the bulk of the people. Next year we'll be back in lodgings that are more affordable for me.


See On the Road with Lyle
if you like this blog, click the +1   or

Like This!


Thursday, September 15, 2016

Scamp

 
I'm at the conference and things are in full swing. Having a great time but always exhausting. I'll start sharing about that maybe tomorrow. Have to find places to plug in and connect.

Anyway, Lyle and I stopped at the Scamp factory in Minnesota to get a few things done on his trailer. Can you believe so many fiberglass trailers?

Scamp trailers

Those were outside. These are inside.

Scamp trailers

Here's where they make the shells by spraying fiberglass into molds.

Scamp trailers

Everything is done by hand. Here they are putting the rubber gasket on the bottom edge.

Scamp trailers

I learned a lot and got a ton of ideas, even though mine is a different brand.

Gotta go- Having a blast with trail friends.


if you like this blog, click the +1   or

Like This!


Related Posts Widget for Blogs by LinkWithin