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Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Windy Nights




Windy Nights
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Whenever the moon and stars are set,
Whenever the wind is high,
All night long in the dark and wet,
A man goes riding by.
Late in the night when the fires are out,
Why does he gallop and gallop about?

Whenever the trees are crying aloud,
And ships are tossed at sea,
By, on the highway, low and loud,
By at the gallop goes he.
By at the gallop he goes, and then
By he comes back at the gallop again.


I practically inhaled A Child's Garden of Verses as a child. This was always one of my favorite poems, and windy nights still raise a strange excitement within me. They make me want to run, and sniff the air, and maybe even howl. (Perhaps it's not so surprising that I seem to understand dogs?)

Last night was just such a time, and with my excitement already aroused by the hike planning, I had to share the swaying pines with you.

Hike Planning Report
Didn't get a lot done- I had some other commitments. Got 2 more days of our custom guide done, for a total of 4 days.

Hiked 1.5 miles with 31 pounds


P.S. I also found this "related article" widget today, the same as Ratty. I'm giving it a whirl for a few days, but if I don't like the articles it picks I'll keep making my own links.

Here are my choices to link:
See Sticky Fingers in Pine Cone City for another view of the pines.
See Wander Thirst for another favorite poem.

7 comments:

Nessa said...

I've always loved poems... there's something about them that calms the heart.

Too bad the education system in my country didn't put much importance in the subject.

rainfield61 said...

I heard trees talking to me instead of crying in the wild.

Sharkbytes (TM) said...

Nessa- You are so right. There is more to words than their meaning... putting them together into poetry really affects the emotions.

rainfield- the trees do talk, don't they? I'm glad you hear them too!

Ratty said...

I've always loved the way poetry can stir the imagination. I enjoyed walking through a windy forest today myself. I had to keep an eye on the treetops though, just to make sure I was safe.

The widget seems to be hit or miss for me so far. I'm still adding my own links too, but I've been spreading them throughout the stories if I can.

Sharkbytes (TM) said...

Yes, I usually skip the cemetery ravine part of my walk on the really windy days. Those trees are old with many dead limbs. I find big ones down after windy days. I don't have any wish to be under one when it falls. Pays to watch where you put a tent too... a few people have died in tents when branches fell on them.

earthtoholly said...

Hi Sharkbytes and thanks for stopping by!

Loved your video and that is a beautiful poem. I, too, love the wind, especially when a thunderstorm is kicking up. Just get a good feeling from it...

Sharkbytes said...

Hi Holly- I can just hear the horseman galloping in the rhythm of the poem. Words really can stir one... add the real wind and it's extra exciting.

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