Entries to Win Afghan


If you like my books, essays, etc. you might want to put your name on this private email list (no spam ever) for advance notices, coupons, and occasional freebies. Tell your friends too! Books Leaving Footprints Newsletter. The most recent issue contained Chapter 2 of Dead Mule Swamp Druggist. Sign up, and don't miss out!"

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Profiles of the Cautious

I really was rushing on Tuesday to get all my assignments done before it got dark, but I managed a couple of stops for wildlife. First is the oh-so-common whitetail deer, but this one was less cautious than you might think, allowing me to get a nice closeup. Maybe she thought I would mistake her for a part of the tree!

Whitetail deer

This one is much more interesting to me. I thought I was going to be able to show you all three types of swans that we have together, but no such luck yet. This is one of the native ones, but after studying the pictures very carefully, I've decided this is another tundra swan, not a trumpeter. I always thought the trumpeters were more commonly seen than the tundras, but not in my pictures. I won't point out the differences until I have pictures that can show you.

Anyway... enjoy the majestic swimmer!

tundra swan

See A Waterfowl Puzzle
if you like this blog, click the +1  

11 comments:

Beyond My Garden said...

It is hard to see a deer while there is enough light to photograph it. All the hunters have sent them into hiding. funny how they all come out just after sunset, mocking my camera lense.
nellie

Elvirah said...

We hardly get to see such wonders so close by. You are lucky to get these shots even during the dull evening light.

Canadian Doomer said...

You know, I rarely have anything useful to say except "wow" at your pictures, but I wanted to take a moment and let you know that I come here daily and look at your latest shots. Absolutely gorgeous. :)

icedgurl said...

trekking your amazing blog! keep blogging!

cheers!
...TREK...

Don't unplug your hub said...

Is the swan difference in their beaks? I'm guessing here. I'll wait patiently to see if I'm right. Maybe it's their size? Length of neck? Colour? OK I'll wait. :-)

Secondary Roads said...

Love those shots. Especially of the doe.

Rebecca Mecomber said...

Great "shot" of the doe!

Glynis said...

I love your pics. I really must get my camera out again!

Ratty said...

Both pictures are great. Two of my favorite kinds of animals. I think I've only ever seen one type of swan myself. Or maybe I just don't know the difference yet.

Ann said...

both are wonderful profiles. Glad you managed to squeeze in the stops for wildlife

Sharkbytes said...

Hi nellie- these ones (there were three) seemed to have no concern at all about me. It was in a private community- maybe they knew it was safe there.

Elvirah- Yes, I am grateful for any critters I can "catch"

CD- Thanks! I do appreciate it. You know I'm a fan of your obsessions too!

icedgurl- thanks for stopping by

John- beaks, heads, and necks are the issues. I hope to get better at telling the two T's apart in the wild. The mute swans have orange beaks. They are easy.

Chuck- she's holding her ears more like a horse.

Rebecca- I really was close to her

Glynis- Yes... you've had some great pix too

Ratty- I'm sure you've seen the mute swans with the orange beaks

Ann- what would a day be without some of those quality stops!

Related Posts Widget for Blogs by LinkWithin